Vimy Militaria
P.O. Box 17018
Portobello RO
1937 Portobello Rd
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
K4A 4W8


First World War Medals

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Gallantry Groups and Singles

     

  Five. Order of the British Empire (2nd Type Civil), British War Medal, Defence Medal (cupro-nickel), War Medal 1939-45 (cupro-nickel), 1937 Coronation Medal. BWM named to MAJOR G.B. JOHNSON, remainder un-named as issued. Group includes miniatures (OBW, BWM and Coronation only), an original framed portrait photo (no glass), as well as a Canadian Governor General's Medal in Bronze (Earl of Minto GCMG 1898) for RMC academics, which is engraved on edge GENTLEMAN CADET GORDON B. JOHNSON. 3RD AGGREGATE MARKS IN FULL COURSE ROYAL MILITARY COLLEGE OF CANADA 1900. Johnson entered the Royal Military College at Kingston, Ontario in September 1897, and was assigned college number 439. He graduated with honours in June 1900, 3rd in his class. Johnson was a Canadian Trade Commissioner in Yokahama, Japan at the outset of the First World War in August 1914. He served as an officer in the Royal Engineers during the First World War, enlisting in August 1915 and being demobilized in March 1919. He continued in Canadian Government service as a trade commissioner after the war, and was serving in this capacity in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil in September 1920. Johnson received the OBE in the London Gazette of 2 June 1943 for service as the Canadian Government Trade Commissioner in Scotland, with special mention of his service in the care for the survivors of the torpedoed steamship 'Athenia', which had been sunk by the German Navy's submarine U-30 off the coast of Scotland while en route to Montreal on 3 September 1939, just hours after the war against Germany had broken out. With service records and copied research from RMC Review. Medals are mounted for wear. An impressive and scarce group to a Canadian Diplomat.

Good VF Condition $1200

  

Four. Military Medal (GV), 1914-15 Star, British War Medal 1914-20, and Victory Medal. MM named to 55603 SJT. A. DUMIGAN. 19/BN: 1/C.ONT.R., Star named with same number but rank PTE., unit 19/CAN:INF:, and pair same number, name, but rank SJT. and unit 19-CAN. INF. Allan Dumigan was born in Dorkington, England on 7 November 1895. He enlisted in the 19th Battalion Canadian Expeditionary Force at Toronto, Ontario on 12 November 1914. He served in France from14 September 1915, and was promoted Corporal on 26 November 1916. Wounded on 11 April 1917 (shell contusion) during the 19th Battalion's attack at Vimy Ridge, he returned to the unit on 13 May 1917, after being promoted to the rank of Lance Sergeant to replace L/Sgt Crommelin, who was listed as 'missing'. He reverted to the rank of Private at his own request on 2 January 1918, but was promoted back to the rank of Cpl and L/Sgt, successively, in early May 1918, and to Sergeant on 12 June 1918. On 27 August 1918, during the battle of Arras, he was wounded again, receiving a gun shot wound to his left arm and neck. Invalided to England, he returned to Canada after the war's end on 1 February 1919. Dumigan was awarded the Military Medal on 1 September 1918 under the authority of 2nd Canadian Division, his award being gazetted in London Gazette 31142 of 24 January 1919. With an original certificate from the Province of Ontario congratulating Mr & Mrs. A. Dumigan of Oshawa on the occasion of their 50th wedding anniversary. Medals swing-mounted on clean older ribbons as worn.

VF Condition $1250

  

Three. Military Medal (GV), British War Medal 1914-20 and Victory Medal. MM named to 1024394 PTE J.P. GRIGNON 75/BN: 1/C.ONT.R., and pair named to same number, rank, name but 75-CAN.INF. Suspender of BWM is slightly bent, and it has some spots of what appears to be red paint on the reverse. MM awarded in London Gazette 30897 of 13 September 1918 (no citation). Grignon was killed in action 9 August 1918 during Battle of Amiens.

Good VF Condition $1200

    

Five. Military Cross (GV) with bar, 1914-15 Star, British War Medal 1914-20, Victory Medal with Mention in Dispatches, and India General Service Medal 1908-35 with clasp "WAZIRISTAN 1921-24". Star named to CAPT. J.D. GEMMILL. R.E. pair named MAJOR J.D. GEMMILL, and IGS named MAJOR. J.D. GEMMILL. R.E. James Dunlop Gemmill was born on 14 December 1885. He attended the Royal Military College at Kingston, entering in 1903 with college number 633. He graduated in 1906, as a CSM, and won the Canadian Governor General's Gold Medal for general proficiency. He was commissioned in the Royal Engineers on 29 June 1906. In 1914, Gemmill was serving as a Lieutenant with 1st (Fortress) Company, Gibraltar. Gemmill was awarded the Military Cross in the London Gazette of 1 January 1918 (New Year's Honours List). He was awarded a bar to the MC in the London Gazette of 18 July 1918 with the following citation:

"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty, during a critical period of an attack, he held back the enemy until reinforcements came up. Later, he made a personal reconnaissance of the whole Brigade front under heavy fire bringing back much valuable information."

Gemmill served in India from mid-1921 until his retirement, as a Lieutenant-Colonel, on 3 December 1922.. After retirement, he returned to his native Canada and took up employment with the Hudson's Bay Company. He was awarded the Hudson Bay Company's Faithful Service Medal for 15 years service in 1941. Group is accompanied by paper copies of research that includes Army List extracts, London Gazette extracts, and a copy of Gemmill's MIC, as well as his Hudson's Bay Company Long Service Medal, and an Ontario Education Department silver medal named to him for Model School, 1897. The Gemmill family were prominent founders of the town of Almonte, Ontario, and more information about them can be found here ). Medals are court-mounted for wear, on clean modern ribbons. MiD device is a smaller type normally used for undress ribbons. An interesting multiple gallantry group to an early RMC graduate from Almonte, Ontario.

Good VF Condn $5200

  

  Three. Military Medal (GV), British War Medal and Victory Medal. MM named to 651361 CPL. A.R. FITZGERALD 1/21 LOND: R., and pair with number 3720, rank SJT, same name, initials, but 21-LOND.R. Alfred Reginald Fitzgerald served in France and Belgium (Theatre 1 (a)) between 2 January 1916 and 7 July 1918, and was awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the London Gazette of 13 March 1918, while serving as a member of the 21st Battalion London Regiment. The LG entry includes the location 'Brixton Hill, S.W.' after his name, which I assume represents his home town or place of enlistment. The LG date of the award suggests it was likely for Cambrai in November 1917. Electronic research documents (copy of medal index card, medal roll entry amd London Gazette record of Military Medal award) are included with the group, which is unmounted on older relatively clean original ribbon.

Good VF Condition $850

  

Three. Military Medal (GV), British War Medal and Victory Medal. Named to 871283 PTE - A.SJT. E.B. SHEILDS 43/MAN. R. on MM, and to same number, rank, initials and but last name spelled SHIELDS and unit shown as 43-CAN.INF. on pair. Ernest Battell Shields was born in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan on 22 August 1887. He was a carpenter/builder in civilian life, and enlisted in Winnipeg, Manitoba in the 183rd Battalion CEF on 25 February 1916, indicating previous membership in the Legion of Frontiersmen. After a period of time spent with reserve formations in England, with his passage to the front delayed by medical issues (concussion deafness), he reached the 43rd Battalion in France on 21 July 1918. While with the 43rd, Shields would have participated in the battle of Amiens, which began on 8 August 1918, and saw the battalion penetrate two miles into enemy territory. The battalion also participated in the battle of Arras (27 August), the breaking of the Drocourt-Queant Line (2 September), and the crossing of the Canal Du Nord between 27 September and 1 October, when the 43rd captured the village of Tilloy and the high ground overlooking Cambrai from the north. Shields was awarded the Military Medal in Canadian Corps Order 1899 on 11 September 1918, later being recorded in London Gazette 31173 of 11 February 1919. There is no recorded citation documenting the circumstances surrounding his MM award. Shields was killed in action on 1 October 1918 during the fighting at Tilloy, and he is buried in Millswitch British Cemetery, Tilloy-les-Cambrai, France. Group includes a Statement of Service document from Library and Archives Canada, produced on 20 March 1986, as well as the original card which accompanied the Memorial Cross sent to his next of kin (the cross is regrettably not with the group). Group is court mounted on newer ribbons, and lacquered.

Good VF Condition $1200

  

Three. Military Medal (GV), British War Medal and Victory Medal. Named to 142178 CPL-L. SJT. S. HOPWOOD 20/BN: 1/C.ONT:R. on MM, and to same number, rank CPL, initials and name with unit shown as 20-CAN.INF. on pair. Hopwood was awarded the Military Medal in Canadian Corps Orders on 31 August 1918. His award has no citation, like most of those awarded in 1918, but was likely for the battle of Amiens on 8-14 Aug 1918, or battle of Vis-en-Artois 29 Aug 1918, as he was wounded in the latter engagement and did not return to duty before war's end. Group is swing mounted as worn on original tattered ribbons, and accompanied by Hopwood's Class A War Service Badge (serial # 139132) and a period pin-backed ribbon bar.

Good VF Condition $1200

  

One. Distinguished Conduct Medal (GV). Named to 13149 LCPL. J. SHARPLES. 2/COY CAN: M.G.C. John Sharples was born in Blackburn, England on 26 April 1896. He indicated his profession on enlistment as 'locomotive fireman'. After enlisting in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, he attested into the 5th Battalion CEF on 21 September 1914 at Valcartier. His service record indicates that he had previously served in the 29th Light Horse, which was based in Saskatchewan; he had also served for 2 years in the British Army, as a member of the 2nd Volunteer Battalion of the East Lancashire Regiment. Sharples joined the 5th Bn in France on 14 May 1915, and served with the latter unit until he was transferred to the 2nd Canadian Infantry Brigade Machine Gun Company on 20 June 1916. Accidentally wounded on 11 September 1916, when he tripped in a trench near Pozieres after cleaning his machine gun, and impaled himself with a cleaning rod that went through the side of his face, he rejoined his unit on 18 November. Sharples was promoted to Lance Corporal on 11 May 1917. Wounded by a gas shell in mid-August 1917 (likely at the battle of Hill 70), Sharples was hospitalized with shrapnel wounds to his hand and the effects of gassing. He rejoined his unit again by 3 October 1917, and was back in action during the battle of Passchendaele, where his gallantry resulted in the award of the Distinguished Conduct Medal, which was published in London Gazette on 28 March 1918. His citation states:

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in action. Early in the day he was left alone with his gun, the remainder of his crew becoming casualties. He mounted it in a commanding position, and kept it in action throughout two whole days, and until he himself became a casualty, and was removed suffering from a concussion.

Sharples service file indicates that he received his concussion wound, as well as a wound to his right thigh, in action on 11 November 1917, which suggests that his DCM was earned during the battle of Passchendaele between 9-11 November 1917. Sharples indicated his intent after discharge was to settle in Sutherland, Saskatchewan. He was discharged from the CEF on 8 May 1919 in Toronto. Medal is on clean original ribbon, and is unmounted. An excellent gallantry award for the Battle of Passchendaele to a twice-wounded soldier from Saskatchewan, one of only 1984 awards of the DCM to the CEF during the First World War.

Good VF Condition $2100

Groups with First World War Medals

1914 and 1914-15 Star Trios

     

  Five. Naval General Service Medal 1909-62 clasp "PERSIAN GULF 1909-1914", 1914-15 Star, British War Medal 1914-20, Victory Medal and Royal Navy Long Service and Good Conduct Medal (GV). NGS named K8860 C.C. LEWIS STO1CL H.M.S. PELORUS, Trio same number, name but rating L. STO. R.N., and LSGC same number, L. STO. H.M.S. CHATHAM. On Lewis' ADM188 service record there is a notation that he was Slightly Wounded in Action on 31 May 1916, the Battle of Jutland, while serving in H.M.S. DUBLIN. This Light Cruiser was hit 13 times and suffered 3 killed and 27 wounded during the battle. Lewis was recalled during the Second World War but only served for two days before being Medically Discharged. Group is swing mounted on older ribbons in John Laidacker style-mount. Some contacting to naming of NGS, and group has been well-polished/worn.

VF Condition $600

  

  Three. 1914-15 Star, British War Medal 1914-20, and Victory Medal. Named to 112120 TPR. H.H. RIDDELL. CAN: CAV: on Star, and to CAPT. H.H. RIDDELL on pair. Hugh Hamilton Riddell was born in Petrolia, Ontario on 21 December 1894 and was working as a clerk when he joined the 7th Canadian Mounted Rifles on 13 January 1915. He embarked for England with his unit in June 1915, and landed in France at Havre on 17 September the same year. Riddell served as a Trooper with the 2nd Canadian Division Cavalry Squadron, which eventually became part of the Canadian Corps Cavalry Regiment before being renamed in February 1917 and becoming the Canadian Light Horse. He left the unit on receiving a temporary commission as a Lieutenant on 13 April 1917, and was transferred to the 1st Battalion, CEF, where he served for the remainder of the war. Medals are loose on older ribbons, which have some adhesive residue and paper from a previous display mounting. A scarce group to a Canadian Light Horse soldier.

Good VF Condition $500

   

  Three. 1914-15 Star, British War Medal 1914-20 and Victory Medal.. Named to 49505 PTE. A.C. SMITH. CAN: A.S.C. on Star, and to same number, rank, name but C.A.V.C. on pair. Albert Charles Smith was born on 10 April 1895, and working as a farmer with his next of kin in Niagara Falls, Ontario when he enrolled in the Remount Depot, Canadian Army Veterinary Corps at Winnipeg, Manitoba on 13 April 1915. He embarked for England on 11 May 1915, and was deployed to France on 5 June 1915, joining the Remount Depot there, before being transferred to 1st Canadian Forestry Company at Dieppe on 14 June 1916. His service later saw him transfer to the 24th Battalion, CEF, who he joined on 27 March 1917, and he was wounded by shrapnel to the left thigh on 3 May 1917. Medals are loose on older ribbons. A scarce group to a soldier who served with the Canadian Army Veterinary Corps.

VF Condition $500

   

  Three. 1914 Star with '5TH AUG-22ND NOV 1914' bar, British War Medal 1914-20, and Victory Medal. Named to T-24841 DVR. T.W. SCRIVENS. A.S.C.. Thomas William Scrivens served in the Royal Army Service Corps. No service file exists for Scrivens, as it was destroyed during the Second World War, but group is accompanied by an electronic copy of the Medal Index Card confirming his awards. Swing mounted as worn on original ribbons.

Good VF Condition $300

  

  Three. 1914-15 Star, British War Medal 1914-20, and Victory Medal. Star named to 6868 PTE. F.T. WEBSTER. 1/CAN:INF:, pair named with same number, name but rank CPL and unit 1-CAN. INF. Frederick Webster was born in Gravesend, England on 31 July 1890. He was a machinist-fitter in civilian life when he joined the 1st Battalion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force at Valcartier, Quebec on 22 September 1914. He claimed 3 years of previous military service in the Heavy Artillery, and was 24 years old on enlistment. Webster deployed overseas with the 1st Canadian Division in October 1914 on the SS Laurentian, and landed in France with the 1st Battalion on 11 February 1915. Webster received a gunshot wound to his left arm during the Second Battle of Ypres on 24 April 1915, and was wounded again by shrapnel to the legs and buttocks on 5 September 1916, when his unit was serving in Somme, France. His service file notes a third wound in April 1917, described as a gun shot wound to the left shoulder (old), but this appears to have been a remnant of his earlier wounding on the Somme which had not yet healed properly. Webster was promoted to Cpl and Sergeant, and was a Cadet in the UK undergoing training for a commission as an officer in the RAF at war's end. He was demobilized in February 1919, returning to Canada on the RMS Royal George. Medals are in good condition and unmounted on long period ribbons, with the ribbons for the BWM and Victory reversed. An interesting First World War group to a 1st Canadian Division soldier with a good deal of active service.

VF Condn $375

 

Four. 1914-15 Star, British War Medal 1914-20, Victory Medal, and Memorial Plaque. Star named to 18338 PTE. W. WALKER R:LANC: R., BWM erased, Victory named to 18338 PTE. W. WALKER R.LANC. R., and plaque named to WILLIAM WALKER. Accompanied by a cap badge for the King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment on a slider backing. Walker died 12 September 1915 aged 37; he is buried at Mailly-Maillet Communal Cemetery Extension, France. Medals poorly court-mounted on felt backing with glue.

VF Condition $300 or best offer

  

  Four. 1914-15 Star, British War Medal 1914-20,Victory Medal and War Medal 1939-45 (cupro-nickel). Star named to 412349 PTE. H.P. CATTANEO 25/CAN:INF:, pair with same number, initials and name but rank L.CPL. and unit 25-CAN. INF.; War Medal 1939-45 un-named as issued. Herbert Peter Cattaneo was born on 26 December 1896 in London, England. He was working as a farmer when he enlisted in the 39th Battalion CEF at Cobourg, Ontario in February 1915. He went to France in November 1915, on transfer to the 25th Bn. Cattaneo received a gun shot wound to his right shoulder while serving in the battle of Courcelette on 17 September 1916; the 22nd and 25th Battalions took this town on the Somme against significant opposition. Invalided back to England, Cattaneo eventually rejoined his battalion in November 1917. Wounded again on 20 September 1918 (Gun shot wound to his right thigh), Cattaneo returned to his battalion in early November 1918 just as the war ended. He took his discharge in England in late July 1919, and appears to have remained there. His Second World War service is un-researched. Medals are unmounted on clean older ribbons stapled to a card backing, with War Medal attached to incorrect ribbon (for CVSM).

VF Condition $375

  

Three. 1914-15 Star, British War Medal 1914-20, and Victory Medal.. Star named to CAPT: E.W. HONSINGER. CAN: A.D.C. and pair named MAJOR E.W. HONSINGER. Eliphalet Wilbur Honsinger was born in St.Thomas, Ontario on 2 November 1880, according to his CEF attestation papers, although some sources indicate he was likely born earlier, in 1873 or 1874. Honsinger was apparently from one of the oldest families in St. Thomas. His mother was Margaret Drake, daughter of Benjamin Drake, whose father donated the land that eventually became the St. Thomas Cemetery. He was a dental surgeon, but indicated 3 years of past military service as QM Sergt of the 25th Regiment, Canadian Militia in Elgin County. He enrolled in the Canadian Army Dental Corps on 5 June 1915 in Ottawa. He embarked in Canada for overseas on 24 June 1915, and was assigned to No. 2 Can CC Station at Shorncliffe in August 1915. He served in France from September 1915 - September 1916, before being repatriated ill to the UK, and the remainder of his service was completed there. Honsinger was well-known in St. Thomas, serving as a member of the Board of Education, and he was also a mason. He passed away at the age of 73, on 26 August 1947. There are several references to Honsinger and his family online, and much more research is possible. Medals are mounted for display on card, on period ribbons, using double-sided tape; 1914-15 Star has been gold-plated. A rare group to the Canadian Army Dental Corps.

Good VF Condn $700

  


Three. 1914 Star, British War Medal 1914-20 and Victory Medal. Star named to 9615 PTE. L. EVANS 2/WORC: R., and pair same number, rank, name but WORC. R. Leonard Evans was born in Tenbury, Worcestershire, England in 1887, and was working as a labourer when he joined the Worcestershire Regiment on 11 November 1905. At the time of his enlistment, he was aged 18 years, 10 months, weighed 135 pounds, and was 5' 9" tall. Evans embarked for France with the 2nd Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment on 12 August 1914. He was wounded in action on 24 September 1914, receiving a gun shot wound to his left leg, and was invalided back to England on the 30th. He returned to France as part of the 17th Reinforcement Draft on 31 August 1915, arriving in Rouen on 1 September 1915, and joining his battalion on the 3rd. Appointed an unpaid LCpl on 20 February 1916, he was hospitalized with myalgia a few weeks later, returning to England for medical treatment on 14 March. Evans was fit enough by early November to return to France, and he disembarked at Rouen on 7 November 1916. He joined his battalion again on the 18th, and was attached to the 23rd Labour Battalion a short time later. He was wounded in action, with a gunshot wound to the abdomen, on 27 December 1916, and he succumbed to this wound on 29 December. He is buried in the CWGC's Grove Town Cemetery, in Meaulte, France. His medals were sent to his wife, Fanny; she received his 1914 Star on 11 July 1919, and his Victory Medal on 21 September 1921; there is no receipt for the BWM in his service file, but it was likely received around the same time. Evans MIC and medal roll entry show no indication that he was awarded the bar to the 1914 Star, although the early date of his wounding would indicate that he was in action early enough to qualify for it. With electronic copy of service record and medal index card/medal roll entry. An attractive group to a soldier who saw action very early in the conflict. Medals are swing mounted on original ribbons.

Good VF Condition $450

  

Six. 1914-15 Star, British War Medal, Victory Medal, Canadian Volunteer Service Medal, War Medal 1939-45 (Canadian issue in silver), and 1935 Jubilee Medal. 1914-15 Star is named to LIEUT. F.L. HENDERSON. 19/CAN:INF:, with pair named CAPT. F.L. HENDERSON, and remainder un-named as issued. Frederick Lewis Henderson was a pre-war officer of Hamilton's 91st Regiment of the Canadian Militia, and went on after serving in the First World War to command its successor, the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders of Canada, between 1932 and 1934. Henderson was born in Hamilton, Ontario on April 29th, 1894. A broker in civilian life, he joined the 19th Battalion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force on November 13th, 1914. Henderson was badly wounded on September 15th 1916 after the battalion took over a series of front line trenches near Courcelette on the Somme, losing his right eye. He was eventually invalided back to Canada in early 1917 after treatment in the UK, and was struck off strength of the CEF in May 1917. The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders of Canada website notes that he was in command of the Regiment as a Lieutenant Colonel from January 2nd 1931 to October 1st, 1934. Henderson was also awarded the Colonial Auxiliary Forces Officers' Decoration in 1931; it is regrettably not with his group. Much more research possible;a group of historical significance to a regimental Commanding Officer.

EF Condn $1000

  

  Four.1914 Star, British War Medal 1914-20, Victory Medal and Memorial Plaque. Named to L-14741 PTE W.H. RICHARDS 4/MIDD'X R. on Star, to L-14741 PTE W.H. RICHARDS. MIDD'X R. on pair, and to WILLIAM HECTOR RICHARDS on plaque. William Hector Richards died on 13 July 1916 while serving with the 4th Battalion, Middlesex Regiment. He is buried in the Commonwealth War Graves Commission's Warlincourt Halte British Cemetery, in Saulty, France. With digital copy of service record and medal roll entries which indicate that Richards enlisted in the Middlesex Regiment at Mill Hill on 5 January 1914. He was posted to the 4th Battalion on 13 February 1914, and proceeded to France on 28 August 1914, joining his unit on 21 September 1914. His service with the unit would have included the battles of La Bassee, Armentieres and Messines in October and November 1914, the First Battle of Ypres, the Winter Operations of 1914-15, the First Attack on Bellewaarde and the Actions at Hooge, as well as the Battle of the Somme on 1 July 1916. His service records indicate his death was accidental, but do not explain the circumstances. Medals are loose on original ribbons, with Memorial Plaque contained in tattered original cardboard holder.

Good VF Condition $750

   

Three. 1914-15 Star, British War Medal 1914-20, Victory Medal. Accompanied by British Empire Service League - Canadian Legion Branch Past President Medal and Class A War Service Badge . Named to 112165 TPR: F.W. YERKS. CAN: CAV: on 1914-15 Star, and to same number/name but with rank SGT, and unit C.E. on pair. Legion medal is named F.W. YERKS BR#216 PETROLIA 1942-45, and Class A War Service Badge numbered 257452. Francis William Yerks was born on January 4th, 1888 in Petrolia, Ontario, and was working as a barber when he enlisted in the 7th Canadian Mounted Rifles at London, Ontario on May 21st, 1915. He embarked for the UK on June 9th, 1915, and landed in France on September 17th the same year as a member of the 2nd Canadian Division Cavalry Squadron. He was attached to the 2nd Canadian Division Signal Company on April 13th, 1916, after having been appointed Lance Corporal on March 3rd. His squadron became part of the Canadian Corps Cavalry Regiment on May 31st, 1916. Yerks rejoined his unit on June 13th, 1916, and was promoted to Corporal on August 29th. Promoted to Sergeant on December 5th 1916, he saw his unit renamed again on February 2nd, 1917, becoming the Canadian Light Horse. Between May 10-29 1917, Yerks was on command in Camiers at the Machine Gun School. On August 13th 1917, he was invalided back to England with heart-related health issues, which resulted in him remaining in the UK for the remainder of the war; his medical records indicate he claimed that he was gassed several times during his service at the front but had never reported sick, and this may have contributed to his ill health. Invalided back to Canada in December 1918, he was discharged from the CEF in London, Ontario on December 23rd, 1918. The reason for his BWM and Victory Medal being named CE (i.e., Canadian Engineers) is not apparent, as he never formally transferred to the latter corps from the CLH, but his short period of service with 2nd Canadaian Division Signal Company in early 1916 suggests he may have been employed in duties of this sort throughout the war. An image of Trooper Yerks, likely taken shortly after his enlistment, can be seen here on the website of Dr. Jonathan Vance, and it appears that a copy can be purchased from the latter. Medals are swing-mounted as worn on clean older ribbons.

Good VF Condition $600

  

Three. 1914-15 Star, British War Medal 1914-20 and Victory Medal. Named to 24349 Pte E. DICKERSON. 13/CAN:INF: on Star, and to 24349 CPL. E. DICKERSON. 13-CAN.INF. on pair. Ernest Dickerson was an original member of the 13th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force, 1st Canadian Division, who attested into C Company at Valcartier, Quebec on 25 August 1914, and arrived in St. Nazaire, France on 15 February 1915. Electronic service record and research file accompanies group; it indicates that Dickerson received a gunshot wound to his left foot on April 15th, 1916 at Ypres while taking a platoon into a new part of the trenches, and he was also gassed. He was transferred to England on the St-George, and admitted to the 2nd Canadian Stationary Hospital on April 22nd. His foot had completely healed by May 8th. Dickerson appears to have remained in England for the remainder of the war, finishing his service with the 5th Reserve Battalion in Sandling, and promoted to Company Sergeant Major on November 16th, 1918. Dickerson was discharged on November 30th, 1919. Medals are individually court-mounted on clean modern ribbons.

Good VF Condition $325



Three. 1914-15 Star, British War Medal 1914-20, and Victory Medal with modern replacement Mention in Dispatches oakleaf. Named to 1747 Pte W. SIRETT CAN.A.M.C. on 1914-15 Star, and to 1747 A. W.O. CL. 2 W. SIRETT C.A.M.C. on pair. Walter Sirett was born on June 4th, 1883 in Bicester, Oxon, England. An auto engineer and mechanic by trade, he married Eva Mary Pinkard in 1903, and immigrated to Canada in 1910. On January 13th, 1915, Sirett enlisted at Toronto, Ontario in the 5th Canadian Field Ambulance. The doctor who passed his medical exam noticed a hammer toe on his right foot, but 17 years of experience as an auto engineer made him a valuable man. He sailed from Halifax on the SS Northland on April 18th, 1915, and arrived in Avonmouth, England on the 29th. Sirett was promoted Acting Sergeant on June 28th, 1915, and appointed instructor of driving at the 5th Canadian Field Ambulance. There was 11 drivers and 7 vehicles per Field Ambulance. The drivers were provided by Divisional Mechanical Transport Company. His unit was inspected by the King on September 2nd, 1915. On September 6th, Sirett was confirmed in the rank of Sergeant, with effect from July 1st, and attached to ASC transport. His unit embarked for France in early September, arriving in Havre, France on the 16th. On March 5th, 1916, a note in the War diary of the 5th Canadian Field Ambulance states that "Commanding officer recommend no 1747 Sergt Walter Sirett and no 1688 Pte William Ewart Morgan for devotion to duty" According to the war diary, they were the first of their unit to receive a decoration or citation. This notice led, on April 30th, to a Mention in Despatch, which was recorded in London Gazette 29623 of June 15th, 1916. On June 14th, an excerpt from Daily Orders notebook for 5th Canadian Field Ambulance notes that Sirett was transferred to the 2nd Division Supply Column C.A.S.C. and attached to the 5th Canadian Field Ambulance to complete personnel of Mechanical Transport Section. He was commanding 13 men at this time. Sirett was promoted Warrant Officer Class 2 on April 30th, 1919, returning from England to Canada on the SS Scotian, with his wife, on June 15th, 1920. Sirett died on October 21st, 1963 in Vancouver, British Columbia at the age of 80. Group comes with electronic research file. Medals are clean and court mounted on modern ribbons. A nice early Mention in Despatches award to a senior non-commissioned officer of the CAMC.

EF Condition $475



Three. 1914-15 Star, British War Medal 1914-20 and Victory Medal. Named to 40714 GNR: A. H. SMITH. CAN: FD: ART: on Star, and to 40714 DVR. A.H. SMITH. C.F.A. on pair. Arthur Harold Smith was an original member of the 1st Canadian Division, who enlisted in Kingston, Ontario on 12 August 1914, and arrived in France as part of the 1st Canadian Artillery Brigade on 8 February 1915. Electronic service record is available online at LAC website; it indicates that Smith spent a lot of time under disciplinary proceedings for absence without leave (AWL) offences, and was medically unfit due to illness from August 1917 until the war's end. Medals court mounted on clean modern ribbons.

Good VF Condition $275

British War Medal/Victory Medal pairs

      

  Two. Africa General Service Medal with clasp "SOMALILAND 1908-10" and British War Medal 1914-20. AGS named to 341752 W. PICKARD. SH. STD. H.M.S. BARHAM., and BWM named with same number, name, but rating V.P.O., unit R.N. Group is unresearched. Medals are un-mounted/loose on clean older ribbons.

VF Condition $275

  

Six. British War Medal 1914-20, 1939-45 Star, Italy Star, Defence Medal (Canadian Issue), Canadian Volunteer Service Medal with Overseas clasp, and War Medal 1939-45 (Canadian issue). BWM named to 639683 PTE. F.E.G. CAIGER 156-CAN. INF. Frank Edward Caiger was underage (16 years old) when he enlisted in the CEF in 1916, and he only served in England, earning the BWM. He later served in the 2nd Field Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery during the Second World War (service # D-13641). Medals swing-mounted as worn. With hard copy research file documenting First and Second World war service. Medals swing-mounted on clean older ribbons as worn.

VF Condition $400

  

Five. British War Medal 1914-20, Defence Medal (Canadian issue), Canadian Volunteer Service Medal with Overseas clasp, War Medal 1939-45, and Memorial Cross (GVI). BWM named to 722137 PTE. H.R. ALLAN. 108-CAN. INF., Second World War medals un-named as issued, and Memorial Cross (GVI) named to M. 26927 Tpr. H.R. ALLAN. Allan was underaged when he joined the CEF during the First World War, and only served in England, receiving the British War Medal with rare naming to the 108th Battalion, which was broken up to provide reinforcements to other battalions at the front. Allan later re-enlisted at the outset of the Second World War, serving in the Calgary Regiment as a Trooper. He was killed on active service in England during training on 7 January 1942, dying of injuries sustained during the roll over of a bren gun carrier. He is buried in the CWGC's Brockwood Military Cemetery in Surrey, England. Details of his death, as well as some photos of him, can be found on VAC's Canadian Virtual War Memorial website. Medals are loose on original ribbons. A tragic group to a soldier of the Calgary Regiment with service in two conflicts.

Good VF Condition $800

 

Two. British War Medal 1914-20 and Victory Medal. Named to 163457 PTE. G. WALLS 75-CAN. INF. George Walls was born on 27 April 1882 in Toronto, Ontario, where he was working as a hydrant inspector when he enlisted in the 84th Battalion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force on 29 July 1915. He embarked for England on 18 June 1916, arriving on 29 June 1916. Like many in the 84th Bn, he was drafted into the 75th Battalion on 1 July 1916, and proceeded overseas to France with the latter unit on 11 August 1916. Disembarking at Havre, France on the 12th, the unit saw its first action at the St. Eloi craters between 15-23 August 1916, when they replaced the 22nd Battalion in the front line. It next fought on the Somme in the battles around Courcelette, Sugar and Regina Trench between 11 and 25 October, and it appears Walls was wounded there. Walls died on 31 October 1916 of wounds received in action, and is buried at the CWGC's Ste. Marie Cemetery in France. Press clippings, including a period photo of him, can be found on the VAC Canadian Virtual War Memorial. An early 75th Battalion casualty of the battle of the Somme.

Good VF Condition $225

 


  Two. British War Medal 1914-20 and Victory Medal. Named to 2. LIEUT. J.E.C. BRANSBURY Second Lieutenant John Eric Cecil Bransbury was 20 years old when he died on 1 April 1916, while serving with 16th Heavy Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery. The son of John and Grace Bransbury, of Putney, formerly of Southsea, Portsmouth, he is buried in the CWGC's Maroeuil British Cemetery in France. Medals are court-mounted on original period ribbon. The Imperial War Museum's register of war memorials notes that there is a brass plaque commemorating his death at St Mary the Virgin Church, Church Lane, Clymping, Arun, West Sussex, England. It reads: IN LOVING MEMORY OF / JOHN ERIC CECIL BRANSBURY / 2ND LIEUTENANT ROYAL ARTILLIERY / ELDER SON OF JOHN BRANSBURY OF PUTNEY LONDON / AND GRANDSON OF THE ABOVE HENRY BRANSBURY / DIED AGED 20 ON THE 1ST APRIL 1916 / WHILE ON ACTIVE SERVICE AT ANZIN ST AUBIN AND / BURIED AT MARDEIL BOTH NEAR ARRAS, FRANCE.

EF Condition $225

  


Two. British War Medal 1914-20 and Victory Medal. Named to CAPT. J.E.N. DEHAITRE. Joseph Eugene Napoleon DeHaitre was born on December 1st 1876 in Huron, Labelle County, Quebec. A surgeon in civilian life, he enrolled in Number 6 General Hospital (Laval University), Canadian Expeditionary Force as a Captain on January 8th 1916. DeHaitre was married, and lived with his wife, Marie Florence DeHaitre, at 239 Laurier Avenue East in Ottawa at the time of his enrollment. He embarked for overseas in Halifax on March 23rd, 1916 in Halifax, sailing on the SS Baltic to England, and landing in Liverpool on April 9th. He arrived as part of 6th General Hospital in Paris on 9 July 1916, and served at 2nd Canadian General Hospital on attachment between October 10th and November 12th that year. With the exception of occasional periods on leave, he served with 6th Canadian General Hospital for the entire war. DeHaitre returned to England on February 20th, 1919, serving for a few months at the CAMC Casualty Company in Shornecliffe and the Canadian Special Hospital in Ethinghill, before leaving England on September 5th, 1919, returning to Canada via Liverpool. He was discharged from the CEF on September 19th, 1919. An interesting and well-worn group to a French-Canadian surgeon who lived in the Ottawa area, with much more research possible. Medals are individually swing mounted on tattered original ribbons.

VF Condition $275



Two. British War Medal 1914-20 and Victory Medal. Named to 3310563 PTE. C. L. YOUNG. C.M.M.G. BDE.. Charles Lafayette Young was born in London, Ontario, and was working as a glycerine maker when he was drafted under the Military Service Act in January 1918. He served in France with the Canadian Motor Machine Gun Brigade. Medals named to the CMMG Bde are relatively scarce, and this unit saw a great deal of fighting during the last 100 days of the war in the lead-up to the Armistice. Medals unmounted, on clean original ribbons.

EF Condition $275



Two. British War Medal 1914-20 and Victory Medal. Named to 469417 SJT. F. ASH. 24-CAN.INF.. Francis Ash was born in Harbour Grace, Newfoundland, and he joined the 64th Battalion CEF on 13 August 1915 in Sydney, Nova Scotia. He was transfered to the 24th Battalion CEF in England in June 1916, joining the unit as a reinforcement in France on 14 July 1916. Ash was promoted Corporal in November 1916, and was promoted Serjeant on 9 April 1917, replacing a comrade who was killed in the battle of Vimy Ridge. He was killed in action on 5 May 1917, and he is commemorated on the Vimy Memorial, France. Medals are on loose faded original ribbons. A very scarce casualty pair to one of the 3296 Newfoundlanders who served in the CEF during the First World War.

VF Condition $750 or best offer

Single 1914-15 Stars

 

  One. 1914 Star with copy '5TH AUG-22ND NOV 1914' bar. Named to B-2/1222 J.J. MATHEWS. ACT. A.B. RNVR BENBOW.BTTN. RND.. Medal is accompanied by research indicating Joseph James Matthews (note spelling) was born 27 July 1895, and had enrolled on 27 June 1913, entering the Benbow Battalion, Royal Naval Division on 22 August 1914, with his rating Ordinary Seaman. His address on enlistment was 7 Brick Street in Bristol, England. Matthews was taken prisoner of war while serving with the 1st Brigade, Benbow Battalion, and was interned in Holland as of 8 October 1914. He was granted leave from Holland from 23 May - 19 June 1918, and was released 19 November 1918. Star is loose on original ribbon, with clasp loose as well. A scarce 1914-15 Star to an early RND POW.

Good VF Condition $300

 

One. 1914-15 Star. Named to 2218 PTE. J. COLLINS. CHES: R. With electronic copy of medal index card indicating that James Collins served as a Private in the Cheshire Regiment with regimental number 2218 and later 290454. He entered the Balkans theatre of war on 8 August 1915, and was killed in action on 26 March 1917 while serving with the 1/7th Cheshire Regiment, during the First Battle of Gaza. He has no known grave, and is commemorated on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission's Jerusalem Memorial.

Good VF Condition $100

 

One. 1914-15 Star. Named to 79546 PTE W.J. SMITH 31/CAN: INF: William James Smith was born in London, England on 8 January 1890, and was working as a steam engineer when he enlisted in the 31st Battalion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force in Wetaskiwin, Alberta on 18 November 1914. His unit entrained in Calgary, Alberta for their voyage overseas on 12 May 1915, and embarked for England on 29 May 1915. After spending the summer training in England, they embarked for France on 18 September 1915. Smith died on 20 September 1916 at 13 General Hospital in Boulogne, France, of wounds received in action on 18 September 1916. He was originally erroneously reported as having been killed in action on 15 September. A photo of him can be found on the VAC Canadian Virtual War Memorial website. Medal is loose on clean older ribbon. An early 31st Battalion casualty of the battle of the Somme.

VF Condition $125

  


  Two. 1914-15 Star and British War Medal 1914-20. Named to 1779 PTE. T. JOHNSON N. STAFF: R. Private Thomas Johnson, from Newcastle-under-Lyme, served with the 1st/5th Battalion of the North Staffordshire Regiment. He was killed in action on 13 October 1915 during the battalion's attack on Hohenzollern Redoubt, and has no known grave. He is commemorated on the CWGC's Loos Memorial, France. Medals are loose on period ribbons. An interesting casualty pair to a regimentally significant action for the North Staffordshire Regiment.

VF Condition $250

 

  One. 1914-15 Star. Named to 99963. GNR. T.H. CRAMMAN. R.F.A. Thomas Hayes Cramman was a member of 147th Brigade Royal Field Artillery, and was en route to the Gallipoli landings when the transport ship carrying his unit, the "Manitou", was attacked by a Turkish ship, the "Dhair Hissar”, on 16 April 1915. The attack occurred between Skyros and Chios, some ten miles off Skyros, while the "Manitou" was in transit from Alexandria to Lemnos, the forward island base for forthcoming operations at Gallipoli. “Dhair Hissar” reportedly gave the “Manitou” eight minutes to abandon ship before it fired torpedoes to sink it. Three torpedoes were apparently eventually fired, but all missed. On abandoning ship, two of the “Manitou”s life boats were lost with heavy loss of life, and Cramman was one of those who perished. Gunner Thomas Cramman, who died on 16 April 1915, is commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Turkey. The story of the attack on the Manitou can be found on the Long Long Trail website. Medal is on clean modern ribbon. A tragic early casualty of the Dardanelles campaign.

VF Condition $150

Single British War Medals

 


One. British War Medal 1914-20. Named to 80039 A. CPL. T. HENDERSON. 31-CAN. INF. Thomas Henderson was born on June 5th 1886 in Tinwald Parish, Dumfries, Scotland. He was working in Edmonton as a mechanical engineer when he enlisted in the 31st Battalion CEF on December 16th, 1914 in Calgary, Alberta. He had previously served for 18 months in the Glasgow Highlanders. Henderson embarked from Canada for England on May 29th, 1915. He was made an acting Corporal on September 2nd, 1915, and embarked for France on September 18th. Henderson was serving in 'C' company of the 31st Battalion when he was killed in action on October 13th, 1915. Originally interred at Kemmel Cemeteries, his grave was later lost, and he is now commemorated on the Menin Gate, Ypres, Belgum. Medal is loose on modern ribbon. An interesting medal to an early casualty of Alberta's 31st Battalion.

VF Condition $100

A selection of single British War Medals named to odd-numbered Canadian battalions

   

  Two. British War Medal 1914-20 and Memorial Cross (GV). BWM named to 172173 A.L.CPL. E. FENSOM. 166-CAN. INF., and Memorial Cross named 172173 Pte. E. FENSOM. Accompanied by a small locket-sized circular portrait of Fensom in uniform (approx 1" wide). Ernest Fensom was born in Sydney, Australia on 25 March 1885. He joined the 83rd Battalion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force at Toronto, Ontario on 27 august 1915, giving his trade as bricklayer. Before proceeding overseas, he transferred to the 166th (Queen's Own Rifles) Battalion, CEF. Fensom embarked at Halifax on 18 October 1916, and disembarked at Liverpool on 28 October 1916. He sadly passed away in the UK as a result of illness, dying of spinal meningitis on 15 February 1917. Ernest Fensom is buried at Seaford Cemetery, UK. A scarce unit naming on the BWM, which was Fensom's full entitlement for overseas service. A poignant grouping to a CEF volunteer.

Good VF Condition $400

One. British War Medal 1914-20. Named to 22149 A.C.S. MJR. S. VAIL. 11-CAN. INF. - $150
One. British War Medal 1914-20. Named to 602897 PTE. G. THOMPSON 34-CAN. INF. - $150
One. British War Medal 1914-20. Named to 404983 A/SJT. A.J. ADAMS 35-CAN. INF. Apparent erasure affecting last three numbers of service number and first letters of rank. - $150
One. British War Medal 1914-20. Named to 436450 A. SJT H.P. MILLS 51/CAN. INF. Name officially corrected, style of unit naming suggests late issue.- $150
One. British War Medal 1914-20. Named to 447386 PTE. J. HUGHES 56-CAN. INF. - $150
One. British War Medal 1914-20. Named to 455796 PTE D.C. MCDONALD 59-CAN. INF. - $150
One. British War Medal 1914-20. Named to 460197 PTE. P. TYDEMAN. 61-CAN. INF. - $150
One. British War Medal 1914-20. Named to 123797 A. SJT. D.S. MAC GREGOR. 70-CAN. INF. - $150
One. British War Medal 1914-20. Named to 163410 A.SJT. L.J. PALMER. 74-CAN. INF. - $150
One. British War Medal 1914-20. Named to 145085 PTE. C.H. HOLLAND. 77-CAN. INF. - $150
One. British War Medal 1914-20. Named to 152987 A.S.Q.M. SJT. A. HULME. 79-CAN. INF. - $150
One. British War Medal 1914-20. Named to 171971 R.Q.M. SJT. F. DOWNIE-BACON. 83-CAN. INF. - $150
One. British War Medal 1914-20. Named to 175340 PTE. W. DEXIER. 86-CAN. INF. - $150
One. British War Medal 1914-20. Named to 212253 A.S.SJT. A.E. PHIPPS. 98-CAN. INF. - $150
One. British War Medal 1914-20. Named to 700045 A.W.O.CL.2. D.J. HUMPHREY. 101-CAN. INF. - $150
One. British War Medal 1914-20. Named to 706648 PTE. H.C. WOODS. 103-CAN. INF. - $150
One. British War Medal 1914-20. Named to 757892 A. SJT. H. EARNSHAW. 120-CAN. INF. - $150
One. British War Medal 1914-20. Named to 760535 PTE. J.C. SHELLINGFORD. 121-CAN. INF. Naming rubbed. - $150
One. British War Medal 1914-20. Named to 797513 PTE. L.B.LEWIS. 123-CAN. INF. - $150
One. British War Medal 1914-20. Named to 772940 PTE. H. REEVE. 125-CAN. INF. - $150
One. British War Medal 1914-20. Named to 240008 A. SJT. D.J. SUTHERLAND. 164-CAN. INF. - $150
One. British War Medal 1914-20. Named to 679304 A.SJT. W.A. WEBB 169-CAN. INF. - $150
One. British War Medal 1914-20. Named to 690184 PTE. H. SAUNDERS. 173-CAN. INF. - $150
One. British War Medal 1914-20. Named to 02596 A. SJT. E. ST. GERMAIN. 183-CAN. INF. Suspender is damaged (missing roller bar and top of one ear) and medal has some edge knocks.- $125
One. British War Medal 1914-20. Named to 874112 PTE. C. CREWE. 184-CAN. INF.- $150
One. British War Medal 1914-20 (disk only). Named to 883708 PTE. A.J. LANE. 187-CAN. INF.- $100
One. British War Medal 1914-20 (disk only). Named to 161023 PTE. W.GERRIE. 194-CAN. INF. - $100
One. British War Medal 1914-20. Named to 237585 A/CPL. S.J. BURSTOW. 204TH CAN. INF. Late issue style naming in large impressed capitals.- $150
One. British War Medal 1914-20. Named to 1000237 PTE. H.E. MUNDY. 226-CAN. INF. - $150
One. British War Medal 1914-20. Named to 1036119 PTE. P.F. CURRIE. 238-CAN. INF. - $150
One. British War Medal 1914-20. Named to 1037610 PTE. W.S. CORK 238-CAN. INF. - $150

Single Victory Medals

  

One. Victory Medal. Named to LIEUT. J.N. LYONS. Lyons received the Distinguished Conduct Medal while serving as a member of 6th Siege Battery Canadian Field Artillery. His award was gazetted in the London Gazette of 17 April 1918. The citation for his award reads:

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on many occasions. On one occasion, when his detachment came under heavy fire, and several casualties occurred, including his officer, he completed his task with great courage and resource, afterwards tending to the wounded and organizing stretcher parties while still under fire.

Medal has an official correction to the initial N. Loose on older worn ribbon.

VF Condition $225

Single Memorial Crosses

 

One. Memorial Cross (GV). Named to LIEUT. G.A. DALZELL. George Alden Dalzell was the Battalion Sergeant Major of the 115th (New Brunswick) Battalion CEF before being commissioned in the Canadian Forestry Corps. He was from Grand Manan, New Brunswick, and died of illness (tuberculosis) on 24 March 1920. He is buried in North Head Anglican Church Cemetery, Grand Manan, New Brunswick.

Good VF Condition $250

Single Long Service Medals

 

One. Colonial Auxiliary Forces Officers' Decoration (GV) Named to HON.LT.COL. H.A. TURNER DURHAM REGT. Turner was awarded his decoration in G.O. 60, 1936. Approx 1600 of this type awarded to Canadians. Award is mounted on original ribbon with brooch.

Good VF Condition $600 or best offer

 

  One. Colonial Auxiliary Forces Officers' Decoration (EVII). Named to HON.CAPT.& Qr MASTER. A.S.HUNTER 56th REGt. Hunter was awarded his decoration in G.O. 36, 1913. Number '6' in unit name appears to have been corrected. Roll indicates rank as 'Quartermaster and Hon Major'. Medal is mounted on slightly faded original ribbon. A scarce EVII decoration, one of only approximately 200 of this type awarded to Canadians.

VF Condition $900 or best offer

   


  One.Colonial Auxiliary Force Long Service Medal (VRI). Named to SERGEANT J. BACON, 3rd. F.B.C.A. The 3rd Field Battery, Canadian Artillery was based in Montreal, Quebec. Medal was awarded in G.O. 24, 1904. No ribbon; one slight edge knock at 9 o'clock. One of approximately 1350 Victorian obverse awards to Canadians.

VF Condition $275 or best offer

  

One. Imperial Service Medal (GV). Named to WILLIAM RUGG. Medal is loose on original tattered ribbon.

Good VF Condition $60 or best offer

 

One. Imperial Service Medal (EVII). Un-named as issued. Mounted with issued pin-back suspender on worn original ribbon.

Good VF Condition $150 or best offer

  


One. Colonial Auxiliary Force Long Service Medal (GV). Named to LIEUT MARTEL J.B. 9th. REGIMENT. Awarded in G.O. 24, 1918. Initial 'B' appears to have been double struck when medal was named, and the 'h' in '9th' also appears to have been struck over what was originally a letter 's'. These errors were not erased, but simply overstruck. Medal is loose on modern ribbon. An attractive early long service award to the Voltigeurs de Quebec.

VF Condition $250 or best offer

Other Inter-war period campaign medals


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